space "The beginning is half of everything."
space Pythagoras (570-500 B.C.); Greek philosopher, mathematician.

space Freeman DNA Test Results

space Revised 18 Mar 2017*
space Expanded Test Results

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Freeman R1b Modal Haplotype

R1b

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24
14
11
11
14
12
12
12
13
13
29
17
 9
10
11
11
25
15
19
29
15
15
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17
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     Use scroll bar to the right of the test results to see additional tests     (If you access pedigree information above - Use the "back" button to return) The following link (Freeman Family Circle) will take you to a new graphic presentation of predicted "time to most recent ancestor" (TMRCA) for R1b participants with at least 25 markers. It is an interesting comparison of how these different family lines evolved from common founder ancestors centuries ago. These relationships have been derived by mathamatical calculations and it is interesting to take a peek at our deep ancestral lines.                   Freeman Family Circle The second link will take you to a page where several banks of data are presented for those of you interested in possible origins and/or migration paths you ancestors may have taken far before the time of written information. The initial study presents our project data in relation to the Capelli et al "A Y-Chromosome Census of the British Isles" data Capelli et al study DNA will not replace good ole fashioned research...but it is becoming more and more of a supporting role which helps validate our research and point us in the right direction if our paths have grown cold. Many cases have been cited where DNA has helped in breaking through a few of those nagging brick walls that have plagued family lines. As one gentleman stated...the cost of a DNA test is insignificant when compared to the money I have spent on research trips...and brought him a family link that his traditional research had not found. What can DNA do for you? Some of the comments we have received may give a small glimpse of the potential of incorporating DNA with our traditional genealogical research. One of the participants wrote " I am just so excited to have a new "cousin." After 35 years of working on this family, I now have new hope of finding our original ancestor and related family. Thanks to DNA." Another of our group who has been in the DNA project for some time sent the following. "I was beginning to think that my husband's line was dropped to earth at SC by spaceships, because I could not find any records prior to 1845 and family legend led me to believe that they were "from" South Carolina. The test has given me hope of breaking through my brick wall. Knowing that there is such a strong likelihood of an ancestor who came to SC from VA, really re-energized my research." She further commented "I have been able to rule out some lines with which I thought there might be a connection within a genealogically significant timeframe" At least one other member has been guided to a different line than he had been actively researching for early family connections through DNA and like the person above have discovered lines that they no longer need to search because the genetic "evidence" has eliminated them as possible close lines of descent. We can't update our test page without sending out our invitation for other Freeman males to became part of our project. So many of us have come a great distant in defining our true Freeman heritage...but we can learn so much more as the number of Freeman males join in and become involved. Since our project began, we have had many lines defined...have had genealogically significant breakthroughs and have discovered how diverse our Freeman family can be. Primarily, our ancestral roots lie in western Europe with a tantalizing sprinkling of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern flavors. Many family historians are who are deeply involved in furthering the use of DNA in conjunction with their research are experts in the fields of genetic sciences and are delving deeply into moving our ancestral lines back to their migratory paths behind the receding sheet of ice. The brainstorming that is currently taking place is creating the foundation for significant advancement in our base of knowledge in this fascinating topic. As more and more data is collected we are getting closer to determining the paths that our ancestors followed as they peopled the ancient lands...fled into areas of refuge during the ice age, then once again fanned across the face of the earth. Many thousands of years ago...the wanderers crossed over bridges of land that no longer exist and became the indigenous peoples of far remote areas that had never been populated before. As people spread out from the middle east bringing the knowledge of farming and raising and herding animals the hunters and gathering societies began to settle into permanent settlements. Although this extends beyond our immediate desire to find our ancestors in a genealogically meaningful timeframe...some will be caught up in the ancient trails of those who came before. Perhaps you have heard about the ambitious project supported by the National Geographic and headed up by the renown Spencer Wells. This 5 year project collected DNA samples from remote areas around the globe as well as solicit participation from the general public. It will be most exciting to see the results when they eventually are published. The folks who are members of the DNA project through FTDNA will have an opportunity to submit their results to the National Geographic database...and be able to see the progress from their own personal pages as the project progresses. Have a brick wall that has perplexed you for a long time? Why not come on board and see if you can find one of our Freeman lines you may tie in to. Or...a DNA test can confirm that you have been tracing the "right" family tree for all these years. In at least one case, DNA testing has been able to correct errors that have been passed down for generations and we have just seen a wall come tumbling down. Several men and woman have taken the mitochondial(mtDNA) test that ties back through their female lines. Several individuals has taken supplemental tests and has proved their Amerindian heritage. I reiterate my recommendation that everyone who is able to do so opt for the 37 marker test versus the lower marker tests. My recommendation is based solely on our experience that the 37 marker test has proved to be far superior to the lower marker testa in defining (or eliminating) the probability of common ancestry in a timeframe that can be used for our genealogical research. Through experience, we have discovered that family associations based strictly on 12 marker matches (without some sort of documentation) can lead to entirely different conclusions when tests are expanded, and the common ancestry could quickly travel back several centuries. I recommend to all participants who do not have a good paper trail back, to at least the 1700's, consider taking the 37 marker test to begin with so misleading "100%" matches are minimized. Our major participation continues to come predominantly from southern Freeman family lines. We have found that many of these early lines began in Virginia. As can be seen, we have developed fairly good profiles of 5 different Virginia family lines. These profiles reflect the true "deep roots" of these various Freeman family lines reaching back to ancestors who lived thousands of years ago. We continue to hold out hope for a documented descendant of Bridges Freeman line can be found so we would have the information needed to answer the centuries old speculation on this line of descent. Thank all of you for your continuing interest and support for our project. As we approach our 12th anniversary in 2014 we continue to grow, but for our project to gain in value to us as researchers as well as the folks in the scientific community who are gleaning more and more information that help them in their quest to learn more of earliest mankind we continually look for additional participants. There are those of us who are still looking for the key that will help us "prove" or firm up our various family lines we need the participation of others who have documented their earliest beginning in the blossoming colonial lands. Would love to have more descendant lines from early New England and New Jersey become involved in our project. We continue to search for answers to move our research forward and to correct age old pedigrees that have been proved faulty. Participation from our English Freeman cousins would have the potential of breaking down many of the documentary barriers we often face when trying to cross the pond. As genetic research and worldwide databases continue to expand, we will be offered more information to help in our quest for our ancestors. I am already seeing new theories on mutation rates coming about because of the wealth of new data that our various projects are providing.